Grey Whales In Magdelena Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico.

The blue whales in the Sea of Cortez (see the previous post) was a neat experience but the grey whale encounters on the Pacific side of the Baja Penisula were breathtaking. Often female grey whales with calves will come up alongside the boat and occasionally let you touch and rub them. This is the experience we had. Grey whales can reach 15 metres (50 feet), weigh about 35 tonnes (75,000 pounds) and live approximately 60 years.


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This Grey Whale Calf, About 2-3 Weeks Old, Stays Very Close To Its Mother In The Bay At Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico.
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Playful Grey Whale Calves Often Come Next To The Boats At Magdelena Bay, Mexico.
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Each Day The Mother Grey Whale Exercises Her Calf To Build Up Its Strength For The Long Journey North In Just A Few Months. Baja California Sur, Mexico.

Each winter the whales migrate from Canada and Alaska south to The Baja Peninsula traveling up to 11,000 kilometres. There are a number of bays and lagoons along the Pacific (western side) where the pregnant mothers deliver their babies. At birth, the calves are about 4 meters (13 feet) long and weigh approximately 800 kg (1,764 pounds)! The babies are often playful and occasionally bring their heads out of the water making interesting photographs.

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This Grey Whale Calf is Only 2-3 Weeks Old And Is Curious At Adolfo Lopez Mateos.
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The Mothers Allow The Calves To Come Next To The Boats. Baja California Sur.
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Grey Whale Calf Leaning On Mom. Notice The Blowhole & Barnacles. Magdelena Bay.
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Not Sure How Well A Grey Whale Calf Can See Above Water. Adolfo Lopez Mateos.
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What Is This Grey Whale Calf Thinking As It Looks At Us? Magdelena Bay, Mexico.

We were hoping to get some good underwater shots with our underwater cameras to get a different perspective of them as most people see then only from the surface. The water, however, is very green filled with phytoplankton and visibility was maybe 10 feet. Therefore, it proved difficult to get any good photographs but we have included a few to give a different perspective.

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Mother Grey Whale Lifting Calf To Surface, Baja California Sur, Mexico
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Playful Grey Whale Calf Next To Its Enormous Mother At Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico


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Grey Whale Calf Approaching Our Boat At Magdelena Bay, Mexico

If someone is wanting a wonderful whale experience for themselves or for their family then we would highly recommend the grey whales at the fishing town of Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Magdelena Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico. We were there towards the end of February.

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Occasionally, The Tail Will Break The Surface As The Grey Whale Begins Its Descent.
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Another Grey Whale Beginning Its Descent In Magdelena Bay, Mexico
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After Descending The Adult Grey Whale Can Remain Submerged For 10-15 Minutes But The Calves Must Surface More Often. Magdelena Bay, Mexico.
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Barnacles Growing On the Skin Of A Grey Whale. Magdelena Bay, Mexico.
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The Blowhole On The Top Is How The Grey Whale Breathes. Baja California Sur.


Blue Whales In The Sea Of Cortez, Baja California Sur, Mexico

Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) are the largest whales in the world reaching lengths approaching 30 metres (100 feet) and weighs up to 180 tonnes (400,000 pounds). They start arriving in the Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Mexico in February each year. There seems to be a sweet spot called the blue triangle where they are regularly seen. Danzante Island, Del Carmen Island and Monserrate Island make up this blue triangle in the Sea of Cortez. Some whales like humpbacks with their spectacular breaches, or grey whales that come next to your boat are more photogenic. However, blue whales just break the surface of the water to exhale, take in more air and descend.

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Blue Whale In Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Sea Of Cortez, Mexico
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Upon Surfacing The Blue Whale Exhales Air From Its Blowhole Creating A Large Waterspout

On our way to our dive site, we saw some large waterspouts caused by the exhaling blue whales off in the distance so a detour was in order. Marine park rules dictate that you keep your boat a specific distance away from the whales. The way it works is that you see the blue whale in the distance, you move the boat towards them but by then they have descended again. The boat captain guesses where he thinks they will come back up (usually 6-9 minutes later) hoping they will surface closer to the boat. We played this game about 8 times and each time they came up a long distance from the boat. Great experience but now it was time to go to our dive site so off we went. Unexpectedly, the whale surfaced about 30-40 metres (100-130 feet) away from the boat which was close enough to get these photographs!

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Blue Whale Blowhole Close-up Just After Exhaling, Sea of Cortez, Mexico
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Blue Whale Beginning Its Decent After Taking In More Air, Loreto Bay National Marine Park
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Descending Blue Whale Showing Small Dorsal Fin, Sea Of Cortez, Mexico


Horn Sharks And Rays: Our First Dive In The Sea Of Cortez A Success!

The purpose of our dive was to photograph Horn sharks and we got lucky on our second dive around Danzante Island in the Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Sea of Cortez, Mexico. Thank you to Juan Carlos Reyes Valerio our dive master for finding these rather reclusive sharks. Although we found 3 different horn sharks, 2 were deep in crevices and they were impossible to photograph. However, it only takes one and this shark was out in the open apparently waiting to be photographed. Horn sharks are not strong swimmers and this shark is trying to tuck as close to the rocks as possible.

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Horn Shark

This area has more than sharks and we saw 3 different species of ray, two that stayed still long enough for us to photograph. The ocellated electric ray or bullseye electric ray (Diplobatis ommata) can generate a moderate electric charge for self-defence. The bullseye or ocellus on the back is very distinctive and is where it derives its name. It is a small ray reaching about 10 inches (25cm) in length.

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Bullseye Electric Ray/Ocellated Electric Ray
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Bullseye Electric Ray/Ocellated Electric Ray

The second ray we were able to photograph was the spotted round ray also known as the Cortez round ray (Urobatis maculatus). They have short tails compared to many other rays and reach a length of about 17 inches (45cm). This ray didn’t stick around for very long before it headed to deeper water.

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Spotted Round Ray/Cortez Round Ray
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Spotted Round Ray/Cortez Round Ray

A surprise for us to come across was the banded guitarfish (Zapteryx exasperata). We were not aware that there were a guitarfish species in the Sea of Cortez. This fish can reach up to 4 feet (1.25m) and has both dorsal fins of nearly identical size. Unfortunately, it had its head facing away from us partly going into a crevice.

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Banded Guitarfish



Hummingbirds In Baja California Sur, Mexico

Every day we walk the arid canyons and hills around Danzante Bay along the Sea of Cortez. The sparse vegetation has many cacti and some flowering shrubs. Surprisingly, we see hummingbirds out here on a regular basis which we did not expect.

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At Villa Del Palmar where we are staying, they have flowering plants that attract the hummingbirds on a regular basis. There are two species that we have identified. The Xantus’ and the Costa’s hummingbirds.

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Xantus’ Hummingbird

Hummingbirds proved difficult to photograph as they don’t stay still for very long. To get closeup shots we shot at 600mm with our 150-600mm lens. With such a narrow field of view, it takes time to find the hummingbirds. After you find it the next step is to focus on the bird but most of the time the hummingbird has decided to move to the next flower. They zip around from flower to flower in a very irregular pattern.

Costa’s Hummingbird


Xantus’ Hummingbird

The key to getting these photos was patience and taking lots of photos (most of them were discarded). Hopefully, you will enjoy these beautiful little birds.Hummingbird7

Xantus’ Hummingbird
Costa’s Hummingbird
Xantus’ Hummingbird
Costa’s Hummingbird

Crevice Weaver Spider (Kukulcania) In Baja California Sur, Mexico

Mystery solved thanks to Spider ID! We stumbled across a large tarantula a few weeks ago that we definitely identified as a Baja tarantula. However, over the last number of days, we have been photographing this spider but couldn’t positively identify it. We were told it was a tarantula but we have discovered that although it is commonly misidentified as a tarantula, it is actually a female Crevice Weaver Spider (Kukulcania).

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There are about 8 individual spider webs like the one below across a 30-foot wide volcanic rock outcrop. It is smaller than the Baja tarantula with the body segments about 1 inch (2.5cm) not including the legs.


The two pictures below were taken on a sunny day which makes the spider look darker. The second picture is a close-up to highlight the eyes.


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This spider came out of his den to investigate what was caught in his web. It attacked the beetle, I assume biting it, spun some web and went back in its den. The whole encounter lasted less than 45 seconds and was fascinating to watch.


Isolated San Javier Mission From 1744 Still In Use

Nestled in the tiny remote village of San Javier is a Jesuit mission called Mision San Francisco Javier de Vigge-Biaundo, or San Javier Mission. The current building dates back to 1744  and is one of the best preserved and oldest Jesuit missions. It is in remarkable shape considering it has had little restoration. In fact, it is still used as a church today.

The drive takes you on a winding road through the Sierra de la Giganta mountain range offering stunning views of the mountains, canyons, and Loretta Bay far in the distance.  We made the trip on our own with a rental car but you can also take a tour or taxi. From the town of Loreta, the drive takes approximately 35 to 45 minutes (38.6/24 miles).

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It is incredible to imagine how the early Jesuits were able to build such a big structure in this remote location. The builders mined limestone from the surrounding hills and the alter pieces were brought by ship and then horseback and donkey from Loretto Bay to the mission.

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The main altar, as well as the two side altars, are framed with 18th-century oil paintings. The altars were built from gold leaf brought in from Mexico City.

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Birds: Often Overlooked In The Serengeti

Okay, we know everyone thinks of lions, elephants, rhinos, hippos, giraffes and leopards: the big animals. While working on our animal photos it became apparent that there were lots of bird photographs. 29 different species to be exact! Of course we want to give the illusion we are intelligent so onto the internet we go to find bird names 🙂 Three of the species below we could not find a matching photograph anywhere. Enjoy the birds and if you see we have labelled a species incorrectly or know the species we have as unknown, then let us know in the comments section.

Black-Headed Heron
Usambiro Barbet
Helmeted Guinea Fowl
Lilac-Breasted Roller
Coqui Francolin


Auger Buzzard
Common Ostrich: Male
Common Ostriches: Female
Egyptian Goose
Spotted Crake?
Greater Flamingoes
Lesser Flamingoes
African White-Backed Vulture
Superb Starling
Unknown Pigeon or Dove: Ngorongoro Crater
Yellow-Billed Stork. Note the crocodile in bottom of picture
White-headed Buffalo Weaver
African Spoonbill
Red-Necked Spurfowl
Great White Pelican
Blacksmith Lapwing
Cattle Egret
Rufous-tailed Weaver
Southern Ground Hornbill
Unknown Weaver: Female
Kori Bustard
Spekes Weaver
Black-winged Stilt
Marabou Stork