Blue Whales In The Sea Of Cortez, Baja California Sur, Mexico

Blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) are the largest whales in the world reaching lengths approaching 30 metres (100 feet) and weighs up to 180 tonnes (400,000 pounds). They start arriving in the Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Mexico in February each year. There seems to be a sweet spot called the blue triangle where they are regularly seen. Danzante Island, Del Carmen Island and Monserrate Island make up this blue triangle in the Sea of Cortez. Some whales like humpbacks with their spectacular breaches, or grey whales that come next to your boat are more photogenic. However, blue whales just break the surface of the water to exhale, take in more air and descend.

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Blue Whale In Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Sea Of Cortez, Mexico
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Upon Surfacing The Blue Whale Exhales Air From Its Blowhole Creating A Large Waterspout

On our way to our dive site, we saw some large waterspouts caused by the exhaling blue whales off in the distance so a detour was in order. Marine park rules dictate that you keep your boat a specific distance away from the whales. The way it works is that you see the blue whale in the distance, you move the boat towards them but by then they have descended again. The boat captain guesses where he thinks they will come back up (usually 6-9 minutes later) hoping they will surface closer to the boat. We played this game about 8 times and each time they came up a long distance from the boat. Great experience but now it was time to go to our dive site so off we went. Unexpectedly, the whale surfaced about 30-40 metres (100-130 feet) away from the boat which was close enough to get these photographs!

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Blue Whale Blowhole Close-up Just After Exhaling, Sea of Cortez, Mexico
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Blue Whale Beginning Its Decent After Taking In More Air, Loreto Bay National Marine Park
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Descending Blue Whale Showing Small Dorsal Fin, Sea Of Cortez, Mexico

 

Crevice Weaver Spider (Kukulcania) In Baja California Sur, Mexico

Mystery solved thanks to Spider ID! We stumbled across a large tarantula a few weeks ago that we definitely identified as a Baja tarantula. However, over the last number of days, we have been photographing this spider but couldn’t positively identify it. We were told it was a tarantula but we have discovered that although it is commonly misidentified as a tarantula, it is actually a female Crevice Weaver Spider (Kukulcania).

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There are about 8 individual spider webs like the one below across a 30-foot wide volcanic rock outcrop. It is smaller than the Baja tarantula with the body segments about 1 inch (2.5cm) not including the legs.

Web

The two pictures below were taken on a sunny day which makes the spider look darker. The second picture is a close-up to highlight the eyes.

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spider closeup

This spider came out of his den to investigate what was caught in his web. It attacked the beetle, I assume biting it, spun some web and went back in its den. The whole encounter lasted less than 45 seconds and was fascinating to watch.

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