Shrimp of Bonaire

Our time in the Dutch island of Bonaire in the Lesser Antilles is quickly coming to an end. Our passion is shark photography but this trip was focussed on learning macro photography – you know, the really little stuff. It started off with frustration but slowly produced some good results. These shrimp range in size from 1/4 inch (2-3mm) to about 1 inch (25mm) and some are very difficult to see, especially the transparent ones. Most of the time they are tucked away inside a sponge or an anemone giving few good photo opportunities. As we discovered, perseverance and a bit of good luck are both needed!

Sun Anemone Shrimp3
Juvenile Sun Anemone shrimp approximately 1/4 inch (2-3mm) in length
squat anemone shrimp 2
Squat anemone shrimp on giant anemone
Pedersen Cleaner Shrimp
Pedersen Cleaner Shrimp
Coral Banded Shrimp (4)
Banded Coral Shrimp
Unknown shrimp
Unidentified shrimp inside Giant Anemone, Bonaire
Red Caribbean Pistol Shrimp
Red Caribbean Pistol Shrimp, Bonaire
peppermint shrimp
Peppermint Shrimp in Sponge (note the crab in the background)
Juvenile Sun Anemone 3
Juvenile Sun anemone shrimp, Bonaire
squat anemone shrimp
Squat Anemone Shrimp, Bonaire
Pedersen Shrimp cropped (3)
Pedersen Cleaner Shrimp Living In A Corkscrew Anemone
banded coral shrimp
Banded Coral Shrimp

Giraffes of the Serengeti, Tanzania

Many animals are extremely difficult to spot in the wild. Giraffes, however, are probably the easiest because they are so tall and can be spotted from a long distance. Occasionally you find them alone but more often you find them in groups. The colours vary a bit as you can see but all are beautiful. Despite their large size they are so graceful when they run but photographs just can’t capture this. However, we hope you will enjoy some of our photos of these majestic Masai Giraffes.

Giraffe (1)

 

Giraffe (2)

Giraffe (4)

Giraffe (6)

Giraffe (7)

 

Mangoes: From Tree To Tricia

The mature mango trees on the Village of Hope Mwanza compound are beginning to produce mangoes much to Tricia’s delight. The harvesting method is simple but effective. Take a long stick and knock them down and if this doesn’t work then climb the tree.

The mangoes fall to the ground and are gathered in piles. A staff member then uses a wheelbarrow to get them away from Tricia as soon as possible and to the children. But if you are lucky you get to try one fresh right off the tree!