Giant Mantas of San Benedicto Island

The focus of our trip was to photograph the giant mantas (Manta birostris) at San Benedicto Island in the Revillagigedo Archipelago. These are the largest mantas in the world and can be more than 20 feet (6 meters) across and weigh up to 3,500 pounds (1600 kilograms). The dive site called “the Boiler” is a cleaning station for these mantas where fish remove parasites from their bodies. Consequently, this site provides the best opportunities to see and photograph these gentle giants.

Giant manta with two remoras attached. San Benedicto Island, Mexico.

The Revillagigedo Archipelago lies approximately 390 kilometers (240 miles) off the coast of Cabo San Lucas in Mexico. These Pacific islands are more commonly referred to as the Socorro Islands. Aboard the Southern Sport, we dove 3 of the 4 islands (Roca Partida, San Benedicto, and Socorro).

“The Boiler” has the best encounters in the Revillagigedo Archipelago, Mexico.

A color variant from the more common black and white manta is an all black or nearly all black manta. It is not a different species of Manta birostris. However, it is exciting when one showed up as it looks so different.

The “black manta” is a color variant of the Manta birostris. Pacific ocean, Mexico.
Both color variants are shown here. San Benedicto Island, Mexico.

San Benedicto is the island for the giant mantas. They are used to divers and show no fear of people. They swim It seems a bit surreal, even a few weeks after our encounter with them, to have had huge mantas swim within a few meters of us. 

What do they think of us when we look into each other’s eyes? “The Boiler”, Mexico.
Pair of mantas (Manta birostris) at San Benedicto island, Pacific ocean, Mexico.
“The Boiler” at San Benedicto Island, in the Revillagigedo Archipelago, Mexico.



Whitetip Reef Sharks: Socorro Islands

The Revillagigedo Archipelago lies approximately 390 kilometers (240 miles) off the coast of Cabo San Lucas in Mexico. These Pacific islands are more commonly referred to as the Socorro islands. Aboard the Southern Sport, we dove 3 of the 4 islands (Roca Partida, San Benedicto, and Socorro). The whitetip reef shark (Triaenodon obesus) is common here.

Whitetip Reef Shark Swimming At El Canyon Dive Site At San Benedicto Island
Male Whitetip Reef Shark. The Reproductive Claspers Are On The Bottom

The whitetip reef shark rarely exceeds 1.6 meters (5 feet). It is nocturnal and rests during the day under ledges and caves.  At Roca Partida, we observed many groups of whitetip reef sharks congregating in groups of 3 to 15 on the ledges. By approaching them slowly we were able to capture this behavior.

Group Of Five Whitetip Reef Sharks On Ledge At Roca Partida


Group Photos Are Possible By Approaching These Sharks Slowly


These sharks hunt at night and eat mainly crustaceans like crabs, lobsters, and shrimp as well as bony fishes. They tend to hunt in groups. During the day, it was interesting to observe many large lobsters out in the open just a few feet away from the whitetip reef sharks. Apparently, the lobsters know that they are safe from these sharks during the day.

If Disturbed Whitetip Reef Sharks Swim A Short Distance And Return To Their Ledge.
Pregnant Female Cruising Over The Volcanic Island Known As Roca Partida.


Grey Whales In Magdelena Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico.

The blue whales in the Sea of Cortez (see the previous post) was a neat experience but the grey whale encounters on the Pacific side of the Baja Penisula were breathtaking. Often female grey whales with calves will come up alongside the boat and occasionally let you touch and rub them. This is the experience we had. Grey whales can reach 15 metres (50 feet), weigh about 35 tonnes (75,000 pounds) and live approximately 60 years.


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This Grey Whale Calf, About 2-3 Weeks Old, Stays Very Close To Its Mother In The Bay At Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico.
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Playful Grey Whale Calves Often Come Next To The Boats At Magdelena Bay, Mexico.
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Each Day The Mother Grey Whale Exercises Her Calf To Build Up Its Strength For The Long Journey North In Just A Few Months. Baja California Sur, Mexico.

Each winter the whales migrate from Canada and Alaska south to The Baja Peninsula traveling up to 11,000 kilometres. There are a number of bays and lagoons along the Pacific (western side) where the pregnant mothers deliver their babies. At birth, the calves are about 4 meters (13 feet) long and weigh approximately 800 kg (1,764 pounds)! The babies are often playful and occasionally bring their heads out of the water making interesting photographs.

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This Grey Whale Calf is Only 2-3 Weeks Old And Is Curious At Adolfo Lopez Mateos.
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The Mothers Allow The Calves To Come Next To The Boats. Baja California Sur.
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Grey Whale Calf Leaning On Mom. Notice The Blowhole & Barnacles. Magdelena Bay.
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Not Sure How Well A Grey Whale Calf Can See Above Water. Adolfo Lopez Mateos.
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What Is This Grey Whale Calf Thinking As It Looks At Us? Magdelena Bay, Mexico.

We were hoping to get some good underwater shots with our underwater cameras to get a different perspective of them as most people see then only from the surface. The water, however, is very green filled with phytoplankton and visibility was maybe 10 feet. Therefore, it proved difficult to get any good photographs but we have included a few to give a different perspective.

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Mother Grey Whale Lifting Calf To Surface, Baja California Sur, Mexico
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Playful Grey Whale Calf Next To Its Enormous Mother At Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico


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Grey Whale Calf Approaching Our Boat At Magdelena Bay, Mexico

If someone is wanting a wonderful whale experience for themselves or for their family then we would highly recommend the grey whales at the fishing town of Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Magdelena Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico. We were there towards the end of February.

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Occasionally, The Tail Will Break The Surface As The Grey Whale Begins Its Descent.
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Another Grey Whale Beginning Its Descent In Magdelena Bay, Mexico
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After Descending The Adult Grey Whale Can Remain Submerged For 10-15 Minutes But The Calves Must Surface More Often. Magdelena Bay, Mexico.
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Barnacles Growing On the Skin Of A Grey Whale. Magdelena Bay, Mexico.
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The Blowhole On The Top Is How The Grey Whale Breathes. Baja California Sur.


Horn Sharks And Rays: Our First Dive In The Sea Of Cortez A Success!

The purpose of our dive was to photograph Horn sharks and we got lucky on our second dive around Danzante Island in the Loreto Bay National Marine Park, Sea of Cortez, Mexico. Thank you to Juan Carlos Reyes Valerio our dive master for finding these rather reclusive sharks. Although we found 3 different horn sharks, 2 were deep in crevices and they were impossible to photograph. However, it only takes one and this shark was out in the open apparently waiting to be photographed. Horn sharks are not strong swimmers and this shark is trying to tuck as close to the rocks as possible.

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Horn Shark

This area has more than sharks and we saw 3 different species of ray, two that stayed still long enough for us to photograph. The ocellated electric ray or bullseye electric ray (Diplobatis ommata) can generate a moderate electric charge for self-defence. The bullseye or ocellus on the back is very distinctive and is where it derives its name. It is a small ray reaching about 10 inches (25cm) in length.

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Bullseye Electric Ray/Ocellated Electric Ray
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Bullseye Electric Ray/Ocellated Electric Ray

The second ray we were able to photograph was the spotted round ray also known as the Cortez round ray (Urobatis maculatus). They have short tails compared to many other rays and reach a length of about 17 inches (45cm). This ray didn’t stick around for very long before it headed to deeper water.

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Spotted Round Ray/Cortez Round Ray
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Spotted Round Ray/Cortez Round Ray

A surprise for us to come across was the banded guitarfish (Zapteryx exasperata). We were not aware that there were a guitarfish species in the Sea of Cortez. This fish can reach up to 4 feet (1.25m) and has both dorsal fins of nearly identical size. Unfortunately, it had its head facing away from us partly going into a crevice.

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Banded Guitarfish



Octopus On The Run

What do you do if you are an octopus out during the day and a diver with a camera spots you? First, you keep still and use camouflage hoping nobody can spot you, but when that fails you need to move. This octopus tried a number of tactics from trying to blend in, making a run for it, to puffing up to what I assume is to make itself look bigger. Here is a picture sequence that lasted less than a minute until it found a hole to retreat into. Safety at last!Octopus-0064octopus7octopus6octopus10octopus2octopus9octopus4octopus8octopus1octopus11octopus12

Finally…. Tiger Sharks!

In South Africa we were supposed to see tiger sharks but they eluded us. In Mozambique we were supposed to see tiger sharks but once again we didn’t see any. Finding a specific shark species around the world is hardly guaranteed as these are wild animals that swim the oceans. However, we were told that if you want to see tiger sharks then you need to go to the world famous “Tiger Beach” to have the highest probability of seeing them. So here we are and finally we have seen tiger sharks!

Pair of Tiger Sharks, Tiger Beach Bahamas
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Happy Tiger Shark
Female Tiger Shark at Fish Tales, Bahamas

Tiger sharks are big sharks. They are generally between 10-14 feet in length and weigh between 850- 1400 pounds. We encountered 8 different tiger sharks and two were in the 14 foot range. Being a few feet from them makes you realize just how big they are and how insignificant you are. Truly amazing creatures and a privilege to share the ocean with them!

Tricia photographing a very large Tiger Shark, Bahamas
Larry photographing a Tiger Shark at Tiger Beach Bahamas

Tiger sharks are intelligent and it is important to maintain eye contact with them. As long as they knew that you were watching them they would keep back about 10 feet or more. But take your eyes off them and they will get close and personal with you. They had this habit of trying to sneak up from behind so we needed to constantly be looking over our shoulders for them. A few times we had to bump them off with our cameras as they got a little too friendly. Perhaps not for most people, but it is very cool and surreal to be face to face with a 1400 pound tiger shark! You can’t help wonder what they are thinking as they swim by and stare you down.

Feisty Female Tiger shark named Jitterbug
Tiger Shark cruising the reef at Fish Tales dive site
Tiger Shark north of Grand Bahama Island