Grey Whales In Magdelena Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico.

The blue whales in the Sea of Cortez (see the previous post) was a neat experience but the grey whale encounters on the Pacific side of the Baja Penisula were breathtaking. Often female grey whales with calves will come up alongside the boat and occasionally let you touch and rub them. This is the experience we had. Grey whales can reach 15 metres (50 feet), weigh about 35 tonnes (75,000 pounds) and live approximately 60 years.

 

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This Grey Whale Calf, About 2-3 Weeks Old, Stays Very Close To Its Mother In The Bay At Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico.
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Playful Grey Whale Calves Often Come Next To The Boats At Magdelena Bay, Mexico.
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Each Day The Mother Grey Whale Exercises Her Calf To Build Up Its Strength For The Long Journey North In Just A Few Months. Baja California Sur, Mexico.

Each winter the whales migrate from Canada and Alaska south to The Baja Peninsula traveling up to 11,000 kilometres. There are a number of bays and lagoons along the Pacific (western side) where the pregnant mothers deliver their babies. At birth, the calves are about 4 meters (13 feet) long and weigh approximately 800 kg (1,764 pounds)! The babies are often playful and occasionally bring their heads out of the water making interesting photographs.

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This Grey Whale Calf is Only 2-3 Weeks Old And Is Curious At Adolfo Lopez Mateos.
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The Mothers Allow The Calves To Come Next To The Boats. Baja California Sur.
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Grey Whale Calf Leaning On Mom. Notice The Blowhole & Barnacles. Magdelena Bay.
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Not Sure How Well A Grey Whale Calf Can See Above Water. Adolfo Lopez Mateos.
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What Is This Grey Whale Calf Thinking As It Looks At Us? Magdelena Bay, Mexico.

We were hoping to get some good underwater shots with our underwater cameras to get a different perspective of them as most people see then only from the surface. The water, however, is very green filled with phytoplankton and visibility was maybe 10 feet. Therefore, it proved difficult to get any good photographs but we have included a few to give a different perspective.

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Mother Grey Whale Lifting Calf To Surface, Baja California Sur, Mexico
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Playful Grey Whale Calf Next To Its Enormous Mother At Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico

 

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Grey Whale Calf Approaching Our Boat At Magdelena Bay, Mexico

If someone is wanting a wonderful whale experience for themselves or for their family then we would highly recommend the grey whales at the fishing town of Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Magdelena Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico. We were there towards the end of February.

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Occasionally, The Tail Will Break The Surface As The Grey Whale Begins Its Descent.
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Another Grey Whale Beginning Its Descent In Magdelena Bay, Mexico
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After Descending The Adult Grey Whale Can Remain Submerged For 10-15 Minutes But The Calves Must Surface More Often. Magdelena Bay, Mexico.
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Barnacles Growing On the Skin Of A Grey Whale. Magdelena Bay, Mexico.
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The Blowhole On The Top Is How The Grey Whale Breathes. Baja California Sur.

 

Crevice Weaver Spider (Kukulcania) In Baja California Sur, Mexico

Mystery solved thanks to Spider ID! We stumbled across a large tarantula a few weeks ago that we definitely identified as a Baja tarantula. However, over the last number of days, we have been photographing this spider but couldn’t positively identify it. We were told it was a tarantula but we have discovered that although it is commonly misidentified as a tarantula, it is actually a female Crevice Weaver Spider (Kukulcania).

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There are about 8 individual spider webs like the one below across a 30-foot wide volcanic rock outcrop. It is smaller than the Baja tarantula with the body segments about 1 inch (2.5cm) not including the legs.

Web

The two pictures below were taken on a sunny day which makes the spider look darker. The second picture is a close-up to highlight the eyes.

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spider closeup

This spider came out of his den to investigate what was caught in his web. It attacked the beetle, I assume biting it, spun some web and went back in its den. The whole encounter lasted less than 45 seconds and was fascinating to watch.

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Shrimp of Bonaire

Our time in the Dutch island of Bonaire in the Lesser Antilles is quickly coming to an end. Our passion is shark photography but this trip was focussed on learning macro photography – you know, the really little stuff. It started off with frustration but slowly produced some good results. These shrimp range in size from 1/4 inch (2-3mm) to about 1 inch (25mm) and some are very difficult to see, especially the transparent ones. Most of the time they are tucked away inside a sponge or an anemone giving few good photo opportunities. As we discovered, perseverance and a bit of good luck are both needed!

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Juvenile Sun Anemone shrimp approximately 1/4 inch (2-3mm) in length
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Squat anemone shrimp on giant anemone
Pedersen Cleaner Shrimp
Pedersen Cleaner Shrimp
Coral Banded Shrimp (4)
Banded Coral Shrimp
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Unidentified shrimp inside Giant Anemone, Bonaire
Red Caribbean Pistol Shrimp
Red Caribbean Pistol Shrimp, Bonaire
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Peppermint Shrimp in Sponge (note the crab in the background)
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Juvenile Sun anemone shrimp, Bonaire
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Squat Anemone Shrimp, Bonaire
Pedersen Shrimp cropped (3)
Pedersen Cleaner Shrimp Living In A Corkscrew Anemone
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Banded Coral Shrimp